Pressed For Answers

I saw a news report earlier this week that almost compelled me to send my remote sailing through my television screen – not because of another falsity coming out of the white house – but because of how naïve the reporter claimed the press to be.

She said “and the reporters at these press conferences sit there with a puzzled look on their face trying to decipher whether what Spicer saying was true or false.” I was so puzzled by that statement I didn’t know whether to laugh in heartbroken cynicism or yell in confused anger.

The content of their discussion is irrelevant but I knew what Spicer said was false. I figured that out from my living room. Why can’t a room full of reporters put their heads together and come to that conclusion. Better yet, why are they not printing headlines that literally say “Trump lies again.”? I’m a big boy; I can handle that kind of the truth.

Trumps agenda of chaos is not accidental nor is it a result of his gross incompetence (they are two separate issues). What his administration is doing is cold and calculated. The technique of creating lies so grandiose that no one could believe someone would lie on such a large scale is straight out of Mein Kampf and the chaos by design agenda is an authoritarian technique that has been played out by dictators of every fare and flavor throughout history. All of this comes from the mind of Trump’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon.

Bannon said in an interview that he is a Leninist and that his goal is “to bring everything crashing down, and destroy all of todays establishment.”

The destruction of America will not come from a foreign source, it will begin within the minds of Americans and if someone can destroy the press they win that battle.

But outright dismantling the press is ridiculous and would be as telegraphed as a quarterback staring down his target ten yards before throwing the pass.

Instead they take a more subtle approach and create so much chaos that the press wears out the public by following these absurdities down rabbit holes.

Here is a simple solution: tell it straight up and simple and call these stories for what they are: lies and propaganda. Print those words on the front page of every major and minor newspaper.

The press is like the pretty boy fighter that comes into the ring with perfect hair, a perfect tan, and a perfectly straight nose, fighting the brawler who likes to tie up and head butt his opponent or throw a low blow when the ref has his back turned.

The Trump administration has openly declared war on the press. Forget the gloves and ring, this fight is out in the parking lot, and as a citizen of this country it would be nice to see my press get some dirt on their uniform and start playing by the rules the Trump administration has declared.

“Falsehoods” are lies. Use language that is plain and direct, that every American can understand. Falsehood is a terrible word that is so soft it might wilt off of the page.

Russia didn’t just “influence” the election; they hijacked our democratic process. Even worse, Americans may have been colluding with Russia to win Trump the election, which is treason, a crime punishable by death in the United States.

Our constitution and democracy has been under attack for decades from the systematic dismantling of our rights through legislation, the militarization of the police force, and the censorship of thoughts and ideas behind the wall of political correctness; but the current state of affairs has us drifting out so far it might be difficult to find the shore again.

The responsibility to guide us back on course falls on the press and their ability to relentlessly dig up and disseminate the unfiltered truth to Americans as the truth continuously vanishes behind a thick fog of corruption and deceit.

Nature v. Nurture and the Millennial Generation

The millennial generation is labeled as lazy and entitled. We forego the American dream of marriage, two-story home with garage, and well paying nine to five jobs, to still live with our parents and pursue alternative career options.

I believe the generation that raised us, mostly baby boomers, taught us a solid work ethic and instilled core values into our fabric of being. The truth is we are not lazy or entitled; we are just different. The classic debate of nature vs. nurture undertones our generational experience as we were raised with the American values of hard work and perseverance, but the world has become less stable and full scale revolutions in the workplace from technology to manufacturing have taken place.

The financial crisis of 2008 left my generation with PTSD and a host of trust issues. The first wave of millennials were graduating college and prepping to enter the work force just as the economic infrastructure of the United States was failing. The housing market, which could be relied upon with the same certainty that the sun sets in the west, collapsed.

The waves of millennials graduating from college after the recession find that jobs paying a wage that justify the tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt are scarce. Slave labor has been repackaged as “unpaid internships”, promising to give college graduates who don’t know better a foot in the door. For entry level jobs, and jobs requiring a few years of experience, wages have remained stagnant; while rent and cost of living increases are swift.

The combining economic factors of cheap foreign labor and automation has shrunk the availability of work for millennials who decided not to go to college. This disproportionately affects millennial males. Women outnumber men in college enrollments, in 2012 by 10% with 71% of women enrolled in college compared to 61% of males.

Manufacturing, construction, and transportation were once reliable industries that non-college educated men could make a good living in. Humans have almost entirely been removed from manufacturing products, and automation is set to do the same in construction and transportation.

We were nurtured to play by rules that governed a different era, and nature has turned all of those ideas on their head. Staying true to biology, we have adapted as a generation – by becoming mobile, less committed, and more entrepreneurial than previous generations.

According to a new survey 43% of millennials moved away from their hometown and 44% said they moved to a more densely populated city than where they grew up. The most common response for moving was jobs, concentrated in big cities where tech industries have blossomed. Nearly half the respondents said they were likely to move in the next year.

As a generation of transients, commitment to a geographic area or city is not an ideal that has been successfully passed down. Millennials have a lower rate of home ownership than other generations did at the same age. The shift in our economy away from manufacturing towards technology has created a pivot in the geographic locale of labor demand; cities like Detroit and others of the rust belt have been traded for tech boomers like San Francisco and Atlanta.

Seventeen years into the twenty first century and it feels like we are closer to a world of the Jetsons than we are to the pre-internet era. The millennial generation is the great guinea pig of history bridging the gap between two periods of time that are as different as the dark ages and the renaissance, and will be studied by future historians as so. We struggle to stay true to the ideals of our forefathers while living in a world our forefathers couldn’t have imagined.